FRUITS IN FINLAND

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AldenG
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Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

Post by AldenG » Tue Nov 09, 2010 10:45 pm

Rob A. wrote:
Yes....that iooks about right....but discussions about the common names of berries almost always seem to degenerate into "jääräpäisyys". I tend to call all wild blueberries by their American name, "huckleberries"....because that was how I learned it as a kid....but even knowing that "bilberry", "blueberry", "huckleberry, "lingonberry",.....are all so very closely related doesn't seem to stop the arguments..... :lol:


So you're saying they're all Finnish Huckleberries? Or even -- nah, never mind.


As he persisted, I was obliged to tootle him gently at first and then, seeing no improvement, to trumpet him vigorously with my horn.

Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

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Rob A.
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Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

Post by Rob A. » Tue Nov 09, 2010 11:38 pm

AldenG wrote:
Rob A. wrote:
Yes....that iooks about right....but discussions about the common names of berries almost always seem to degenerate into "jääräpäisyys". I tend to call all wild blueberries by their American name, "huckleberries"....because that was how I learned it as a kid....but even knowing that "bilberry", "blueberry", "huckleberry, "lingonberry",.....are all so very closely related doesn't seem to stop the arguments..... :lol:


So you're saying they're all Finnish Huckleberries? Or even -- nah, never mind.


:D IMHO, you wouldn't be wrong to assert that.... Here's what wiki has to say:

"While some Vaccinium species, such as Vaccinium parvifolium, the Red Huckleberry, are always called huckleberries, other species may be called blueberries or huckleberries depending upon local custom. Usually, the distinction between them is that blueberries have numerous tiny seeds, while huckleberries have 10 larger seeds (making them more difficult to eat)."

....but I guess in the end, local knowledge is always needed....the flavour can be quite variable depending on exactly which species you're dealing with.... They are all part of genus, Vaccinium, which I suppose is derived from the Latin word for "cow"... so that probably means Linnaeus named the first one in this genus, which, no doubt, would have been the lingonberry/cowberry....

In the wet, wet, West Coast rain forest of NA there is a delightful bright red "huckleberry", quite small, and quite abundant in season..but I suppose someone from Minnesota would be totally confused by it being called a "huckleberry"..... :D


ajl
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Location: Pacific Northwest, US

Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

Post by ajl » Wed Nov 10, 2010 10:48 am

One can get those (red) huckleberries all over the northwestern coast (wa state & bc province), not limited to temperate rain forests.
(Huckleberries were only red when people talked about in the 70s there, even grew in unkempt areas of neighbors' yards)

Better selling point for visiting some rain forests ..the slugs in the Hoh Rain Forest are supposed to be huge! Too bad the carbon
river road has washed out too often to count since that gets one to a rain forest and access to the lowest glacier in the US (the
hike now is too long for the younger ones).
moving is in the bad <-> crazy continuum


Rob A.
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Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

Post by Rob A. » Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:23 pm

ajl wrote:One can get those (red) huckleberries all over the northwestern coast (wa state & bc province), not limited to temperate rain forests.
(Huckleberries were only red when people talked about in the 70s there, even grew in unkempt areas of neighbors' yards)

Better selling point for visiting some rain forests ..the slugs in the Hoh Rain Forest are supposed to be huge! Too bad the carbon
river road has washed out too often to count since that gets one to a rain forest and access to the lowest glacier in the US (the
hike now is too long for the younger ones).


Aha...you're talking about the Pacific banana slug....and they are big....and, according to wiki, usually yellow....but I've just as often seen green ones, mottled ones, light greeny yellow ones, and creamy white ones.....they look gross, but are harmless....

Image

Last year during a fall hike near Mt. Baker up in the alpine there was still an abundant crop of "blueberries"....I still called them "huckleberries"....but I suspect I'm in the minority with that....

Here's a link with some beautiful photos taken in the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest....These actually taken just a couple of weeks before we were there....and I didn't see any "blueberries" as big as ones in the photo...I guess that SOB got all the good ones.... :lol:

[Edit: typos]
{2nd Edit: Oops...I've been advised by by the "recordskeeper" that we were there 30 Aug...a couple of weeks BEFORE the photos in the link were taken....so I guess we were too early for the good blueberry crop...:D].
Last edited by Rob A. on Thu Nov 11, 2010 2:52 am, edited 2 times in total.


sister Yasmeen
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Location: Kaakkois-Suomi, South East Finland

Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

Post by sister Yasmeen » Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:40 pm

I posted this about Finnish berries to other forum. May this will be usefull also in here:

Finnish wild berries

LINGONBERRY
Vaccinium vitis-idaea

Image

The lingonberry grows on dry forest soil, typically in pine forests and lichen heaths where the undergrowth is not very dense. The dark red berries can be found growing in clusters on short shrubs close to the ground. The thick, wax-coated leaves of the shrubs are dark green coloured. Lingonberries are ready for picking in late August and the season lasts until the end of September.

Lingonberries are used in different kind of jams, jellies and juices. Lingonberry jelly nicely flavours meat courses. Whipped lingonberry pudding served with cream is a traditional dessert. Lingonberry can also be used as spice in bread. The sharp tasting lingonberry juice can be served to different meals, and due to its distinct flavour, bartenders like to use it in drinks.

Lingonberries can simply be preserved in their own juice, since the berries contain all the natural acids and sugar needed. In fact, lingonberries contain more sugar than the sweeter-tasting blueberries, but their sweetness is covered by acids. Lingonberries are very rich in various polyphenols like resveratrol, proanthocyanidins and lignans. Lingonberries contain also significant amounts of minerals like manganese.


BLUEBERRY
Vaccinium myrtillus

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Blueberry needs more water and richer soil than lingonberry and can typically be found growing in spruce forests. The shrubs are light green, and the berries are dark blue. Blueberries are ready for picking in late July and the season lasts until the beginning of September. The berries have a sweet flavour, even though they do not contain very much sugar.

Blueberries are used in soups, puddings, pastries, and even porridges. Fresh-baked blueberry pie is certainly one of the best delicacies. Blueberry juice can be served with meals and it is also used to bring down fever in case of influenza. Warm blueberry soup makes an excellent refreshment after an outing in the cold winter weather. Since blueberries contain a low proportion of natural acids, they cannot be preserved without sugar or some other preservative.

The most usual ways to preserve berries are freezing, drying or processing them into purée or juice. Blueberry is rich in vitamin C and E and also dietary fiber. Blueberries contain certain polyphenols such as anthocyanidins. These compounds give berries their natural dark blue or red colouring. Anthocyanidins are studied for crepuscular vision and changes caused by ageing.


CLOUDBERRY
Rubus chamaemorus

Image

Cloudberry grows in distant swamps and deep forests mostly in northern Finland and Lapland. The big leaves of the plant are dark green and as the berries ripen, they turn from orange to bright yellow. The berries are ready for picking around mid July or early August.

Cloudberries are at their best when served fresh picked, for example on pancakes or waffles with some ice cream or whipped cream. Cloudberries have a subtle, delicious flavour and they are commonly used in bakeries to decorate cakes and desserts.

The food industry uses cloudberries in yoghurts, and one of the specialities of distilleries is a brand of fine sweet liqueur made from cloudberries. Cloudberries are usually preserved frozen or as juice or jelly. The fresh berries are very rich in vitamin C (100mg/100g of berries) and E (3,0 mg/100 g of berries) and dietary fiber (6,3 g/ 100 g of berries).


CROWBERRY
Empetrum nigrum spp. nigrum, E. nigrum spp. hermaphroditum

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The light green shrubs of crowberry grow on hilly heaths, bogs and even in the barren peatlands and fields of Lapland. The season for crowberries begins in early August and lasts until the first snow. The berries can even be picked in the spring after the snow has melted.

Crowberries are used in jellies and soups. The berries have hardly any natural acids, and because of that, crowberry juice or jelly goes excellently with other more acid berries. Crowberries contain plenty of polyphenols like anthocyanidins. Crowberries dark blue colour comes from these natural compounds.


CRANBERRY
Vaccinium oxycoccos

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Another wild berry that very much resembles lingonberry is cranberry, which can be found growing on the banks of forest ponds and lakes. These berries are ready for picking in late September and they are usually at their best after the first cold nights. The berries are used in cooking in the same way as lingonberries. Jelly made of cranberries particularly well flavours wild game courses.


BUCKTHORN BERRY
Hippophae rhamnoides

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Buckthorn can be found in the Åland Islands and open shores of the northern Baltic Sea. Buckthorn grows in large, impenetrable bushes. The juicy, orange berries are very tightly attached to the twigs and they easily come off only after the first cold nights in October.

The juice can also be extracted from the berries without removing them from the bushes by using a specially designed tool. Buckthorn berries are very rich in vitamin C (165 mg/100g), E (3 mg/100 g) and dietary fiber (6 g/100 g). They also contain carotenoids, the pre-stage of A-vitamin. Theres plenty of fat in berries 5g/100 g in the healthy form of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Because buckthorn berries contain lots of malic acid, they have a sour, sharp taste. In the kitchen, these berries are commonly used to make juices mixed with other berries or fruits, and different kinds of puddings and soups, etc


RASPBERRY
Rubus idaeus

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Raspberry grows in groves and deciduous tree forests. It is also very common for raspberry bushes of tall, slender twigs with large, dark and green leaves, to take over wastelands, old meadows, and drained swamps. Raspberry can also be found growing wild by the foundations of buildings. The best season for raspberries lasts from July to August.

Raspberry has a strong, sweet taste. The berries are preserved frozen, dried, and processed as jelly or juice. Because of its delicious flavour, raspberry jam is commonly used in desserts and pastries, whereas raspberry juice is a special favourite of children.

And as cloudberries also, raspberries are used by distilleries to make sweet liqueur. Raspberry leaves are used as medicine and they are dried to make fine-tasting tea.


ROWANBERRY
Sorbus aucuparia

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The Rowantree (also known as mountain ash) was considered a holy tree by the ancient Finns. It gives a good crop of berries (up to ten - thirty kilos of berries per tree) approximately every two years. The berries grow in large clusters and turn from green to bright red as they ripen.

The berries are ready for picking in August or September. Rowanberries contain lots of sugar, carotene and vitamin C (98mg /100 g). The berries are used in cooking as juice or as jelly flavoured with some carrot or apple.

Maybe the best way to bring forth the fine flavour of rowanberries is to make sweet jelly with some sugar. Young rowantree leaves and buds can also be used in salads and old leaves can be dried for herbal tea.


ARCTIC BRAMLE
Rubus arcticus

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Arctic bramble is maybe the most exotic and finest flavoured wild berry. It grows on nutrient swamps, lakeside meadows, banks of field drains and groves. The leaves of the plant are dark green, and the berries resemble raspberries, except for smaller size. Arctic brambles are ready for picking in July or August.

Arctic bramble has an extremely fine, rich flavour. It is this flavour, combined with the fact that these berries are quite rare, that makes it an appreciated and highly valuable merchandise. A great part of arctic brambles sold on the market are used by distilleries to make sweet liqueur.

The fine flavour of arctic bramble can best be preserved as juice. Even a small amount of this juice can give a drink a smooth, full taste. The leaves of arctic bramble can be dried to make herbal tea.
Last edited by sister Yasmeen on Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.


sammy
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Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

Post by sammy » Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:59 pm

sister Yasmeen,

that's a nice set - but with at least one small mistake: bilberries are not the same as blueberries! (What you've written about them rings true, but seems to refer to blueberries... bilberries are edible, but not by half as popular as blueberries - it's definitely blueberry pie!)

Vaccinium myrtillus = Blueberry (click for image)

Vaccinium uliginosum = Bilberry (click for image)

They look more than a bit similar, though. I think the picture you have labelled "bilberry" is actually a blueberry.

And you could add "ahomansikka" (Fragaria vesca, woodland strawberry) :)

Image


sister Yasmeen
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Location: Kaakkois-Suomi, South East Finland

Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

Post by sister Yasmeen » Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:39 pm

Thanks about correcting; I edited to my post bilberry as blueberry.


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Pursuivant
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Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

Post by Pursuivant » Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:28 am

Rob A. wrote:they look gross, but are harmless....

How do they taste asked the frenchman in me :lol:
"By the pricking of my thumbs,
Something wicked this way comes."


Rob A.
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Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

Post by Rob A. » Sat Nov 13, 2010 10:17 pm

Pursuivant wrote:
Rob A. wrote:they look gross, but are harmless....

How do they taste asked the frenchman in me :lol:


:D Well, I guess you can tell your "internal Frenchman" that they are edible... though you have to get rid of the slime...apparently it will make you tongue numb...and you also want to make sure where they come from....they can pick up a lot of unhealthy substances.... :D

http://rickshawunschooling.blogspot.com ... -meat.html

....but, as for me, I think I'll give them a miss... :lol:


FinnGuyHelsinki
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Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

Post by FinnGuyHelsinki » Mon Nov 15, 2010 8:48 am

sammy wrote:sister Yasmeen,

that's a nice set - but with at least one small mistake: bilberries are not the same as blueberries! (What you've written about them rings true, but seems to refer to blueberries... bilberries are edible, but not by half as popular as blueberries - it's definitely blueberry pie!)

Vaccinium myrtillus = Blueberry (click for image)

Vaccinium uliginosum = Bilberry (click for image)

They look more than a bit similar, though. I think the picture you have labelled "bilberry" is actually a blueberry.



Are you certain it's not the other way around? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilberry


Lars T
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Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

Post by Lars T » Sat Jul 23, 2016 2:21 am

EP wrote:Apples, plums, cherries – but plums and cherries only in the south. Lots of strawberries and cranberries. And then there are blueberries, lingonberries and cloudberries that are not grown, they grow in the forests and swamps.

Everything else is imported: oranges, lemons and limes, melons, mangoes, peaches, kiwis, pineapples and so on.
I'm wondering if CHERRIES are grown commercially for export in Finland? Who can I contact for more information?

Thanks,

Lars T


Rosamunda
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Re: FRUITS IN FINLAND

Post by Rosamunda » Sat Jul 23, 2016 10:21 pm

Do you mean sweet (dessert) cherries or sour cherries?

I have never seen Finnish cherries for sale in shops or markets here. I have grown them myself (a sweet cherry) and they ripen at the end of July, so much later than elsewhere in Europe and they are not as sweet as cherries from further south. I can't imagine why anyone would grow them for export - the price would never be competitive.

Saskatoonberries are grown commercially in Finland but only in small quantities. I don't think they are exported as raw fruit but it is possible that fruit syrups, jam, candies etc are exported.


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