Saskatoon berries - cultivation

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Rosamunda
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Saskatoon berries - cultivation

Post by Rosamunda » Mon Oct 15, 2012 6:56 pm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saskatoon_berry
http://fi.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marjatuomipihlaja

I have recently planted a few dozen of these and would be really interested in hearing from anyone wlse who grows them in Finland (or even Canada...). Ours are on a sheltered, south-facing slope, well-drained soil (previously used for growing wheat / oats) in southern Finland.

At the moment I need some first-hand tips on caring for them over the winter, in particular protecting them from rabbits and deer (we have planted ours in sapling tubes).

Would also be interested in getting any info on storing/preserving the fruit and/or cooking with the berries.

:D



Saskatoon berries - cultivation

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Pursuivant
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Re: Saskatoon berries - cultivation

Post by Pursuivant » Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:07 pm

Oh and moles too... You build a "box" out of chicken wire to keep them wabbits at bay. But rolling the protector along the trunk is recommended as well.
"By the pricking of my thumbs,
Something wicked this way comes."


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Cory
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Re: Saskatoon berries - cultivation

Post by Cory » Tue Oct 16, 2012 8:18 am

These wild bushes originated in the cold wind swept plains of Saskatchewan...loads of snow and down to -40c in the winter. They can grow to heights of 3-4 metres. I don't remember my Mom or my Grandma ever protected them from wind, snow, rabbits, etc. If they're the only plant in the area, of course the rabbits might start stripping them so put some metal chicken wire around them. Great dried berries, btw!
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Pursuivant
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Re: Saskatoon berries - cultivation

Post by Pursuivant » Tue Oct 16, 2012 8:58 am

Them bloody vermin ate one year my hawthorn fence and decimated the neighbours thuja/juniper/pine rock garden.
"By the pricking of my thumbs,
Something wicked this way comes."


Rosamunda
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Re: Saskatoon berries - cultivation

Post by Rosamunda » Tue Oct 16, 2012 11:03 am

Moles aren't a problem but yes, those small rodents (mice, rats, voles???) that nest in the roots of trees are a real pain, We were told to bury broken glass around the root system.

These plants are VERY small (we got them from the MTT research place) which is why they are so vulnerable in the beginning. They are too small to tape at the moment. Chicken wire is probably a good idea but the area is quite large, we have 4 metres between the rows and IIRC 15 bushes in each row...


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Cory
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Re: Saskatoon berries - cultivation

Post by Cory » Tue Oct 16, 2012 8:35 pm

:lol: These bushes are some of the hardiest around. My Mom has a monster growing in the corner of her garden which propogates a zillion smaller plants every summer, when the berries are dropping, and most of these little plants survive and need to be pulled out in the spring.They are very hardy plants but if you're concerned then do what the people have told you to do. In the wild, these bushes grow so densely that it's impossible to walk through them. They are certainly not as invasive as blackberry bushes (which I'm fighting with at the moment) but they are survivors!
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Rosamunda
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Re: Saskatoon berries - cultivation

Post by Rosamunda » Thu Oct 18, 2012 3:39 pm

My dh seems to agree with you. He's been googling and chatting on puutarha.net and it does seem that they survive pretty much anything and everything. I just hope we get fruit within 3-4 years.

Surprised you have blackberries. I have tried to grow them in Raasepori without any success (I planted a bush and then forgot where I put it, but since I can't find it anywhere I assumed it died). The cultivated ones don't taste as good as the wild ones but I am yet to find any growing in the wild around here (but just got back from the UK where they grow in all the hedgerows - not a great year though due to the rain and lack of sunshine). Did you plant them or are yours wild brambles?


tuulen
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Re: Saskatoon berries - cultivation

Post by tuulen » Sat Oct 20, 2012 12:54 am

In winter, small rodents might eat the bark from the berry bushes, up to the snow line and killing the bushes.


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Cory
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Re: Saskatoon berries - cultivation

Post by Cory » Sat Oct 20, 2012 12:31 pm

Rosamunda wrote:My dh seems to agree with you. He's been googling and chatting on puutarha.net and it does seem that they survive pretty much anything and everything. I just hope we get fruit within 3-4 years.

Surprised you have blackberries. I have tried to grow them in Raasepori without any success (I planted a bush and then forgot where I put it, but since I can't find it anywhere I assumed it died). The cultivated ones don't taste as good as the wild ones but I am yet to find any growing in the wild around here (but just got back from the UK where they grow in all the hedgerows - not a great year though due to the rain and lack of sunshine). Did you plant them or are yours wild brambles?
I brought my blackberry saplings from grannies backyard 3 years ago. They will be original wild bushes from the Canadian prairies.. Very big juicy berries on hardy bushes with thorns that can skin a cat. They've started to spread very invasively into the neighbors yard so won't be long til they're wild in the nearby fields.
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Rosamunda
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Re: Saskatoon berries - cultivation

Post by Rosamunda » Sat Oct 20, 2012 5:25 pm

I guess I should've uprooted a few from the woods around where my folks live in Somerset. They are so good to eat, especially in apple pie...


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