Changing my residence permit B2 to A status?

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aRabbit
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Changing my residence permit B2 to A status?

Post by aRabbit » Mon Nov 03, 2003 6:03 pm

Hello every1! Totally new to this forum, just registered a moment ago actually. I still have questions about my residence permit although I have quickly gone through some related posts here. :)
Let me first explain my situation here. I am a foreign girl who has been studying in Finland for 4 years.(with B2) I have been living with my Finnish BF for more than 2 years now. I am thinking the possibility to change my residence permit B2 to categoryA. I was trying to ask when I was in Police station getting those application forms and info. That person told me I will possibly get A5. Is that so? What does it actually mean by having A5? Any social benefits come after? Kela benifits, for example? What about student allowance? I am so new to all this.. Gush :o
Yet the key question is how likely I will be granted A5? I am a student and my BF is studying too. Plus, our 2 years of living together is in Finland not before my arrival to Finland. So so....will that be a big problem?
Kind of urgent issue. Please share out opinions and advices!!



Changing my residence permit B2 to A status?

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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Mon Nov 03, 2003 6:13 pm

Hi, and welcome to the group!

The 'where' issue is not a problem, if your "living together" is documented. They believe Finnish papers I think better than foreign papers. Basically you have to have been registered in the same flat for these two years (if you have been skirting with KELA monies and have other "live" registered somewhere else, now it hurts you here). So you go to the magistrate and ask for a paper to show that the flat you live in has had you two living in there for the two years (or the places you have lived in).

Basically 'A5' means that you are a permanent resident because of a Finnish spouse. Student allowance requires you to live 2 years as a resident in Finland, but A5... hmmm... someone else might elaborate on that, I think it is 'permanant' that is required..
Cheers, Hank W.
sitting here like a lemon looking for a gin.


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aRabbit
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Post by aRabbit » Mon Nov 03, 2003 6:37 pm

Thanx Hank W! I will get those required certificates for the application, and hand it over to them as soon as possible. Things are just keeping me nervous.


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Post by aRabbit » Mon Nov 03, 2003 9:22 pm

Just thinking I don't have income in Finland and BF is studying too. The form "Account of the Applicant's Family Life and Livelihood" makes me very uncertain. cause I've heard it's rather hard to apply for A-status as two are both students, so and so... Hmm :?
Reality is when you stop believing, it will not vanish.


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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Mon Nov 03, 2003 9:29 pm

Well, it doesn't require the 'amen of a priest' to get an A5 these days, you just need to sign a form in the magistrate :mrgreen:
Cheers, Hank W.
sitting here like a lemon looking for a gin.


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Post by Sankalp » Tue Nov 04, 2003 9:47 am

Well, it doesn't require the 'amen of a priest' to get an A5 these days, you just need to sign a form in the magistrate.


That makes you legally married as per Finnish law. :) Is it that way Hanks ?


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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Tue Nov 04, 2003 10:25 am

Ssshhh.... thats in the small print. :D

Yes, basically say if people are from a religion not so well established in Finland and thus have a officiant that has no right to perform a legal marriage in Finland, they have to go sign a paper at the magistrate anyhow to have the marriage legally valid. You can have a civilian seremony there as well if you prefer, but it really is the signing of the documents that makes the marriage legal, so in principle you can get by without any pomp&ceremony. It was quite in vogue in the 1970's but people prefer having a ceremony these days I think. It is the same thing if you are from different religions, the priest in the Evangelic Lutheran won't 'marry' you as you are not a member of the congregation, but rather do a blessing, but unless you know the formals thoroughly people won't notice any difference.

Really isn't that different from many other countries, here the Evangelic Lutheran and Orthodox churches submit the data automatically, but in other countries you have to go to the city hall and get a certificate or something.

The thing is also, that before getting married in Finland one has to submit papers and get done 'investigation on obstacles' basically that neither party is married, they are not siblings, they are over 18 etc. So there comes with foreigners the task of providing official documentation that states they are eligible etc.
Cheers, Hank W.
sitting here like a lemon looking for a gin.


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