Immigration lawyer

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PeterF
Posts: 4144
Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2002 10:00 pm

Post by PeterF » Wed Nov 26, 2003 3:49 pm

sy wrote:I think you all read vp's question wrong. If you read carefully, you can see that vp is now in Finland. What he/she needs from a lawyer is how to secure a "better" residence permit status.

My opinion is, you do need a lawyer or at least someone familiar with immigration laws to help you to prepare your application: to indicate clearly your demand, to gather relevant documents to support your claim, to cite indisputably the applicable law paragraphs. In case of rejection, then you definitely need a lawyer to represent you in the appeal court.
Well Sy thank you for spotting that vp is already here..he/she does indicate either status is possible but not 100% clear..e.g."jump down from my palm tree and come to Finland"

I was not aware that the Finnish imigration system employed a "caste" system for vetting imigrants and deciding on status.

However, that is not relevant ..simple facts are that we, ., do not believe that there are lawyers in Finland that specialise in immigration, or who would take on a client requiring/needing help to obtain better residents status.
However, I did post a link to a group of International Lawyers who might have amongst their members someone who might help vp.

Here is the link again.
http://www.forum-legal.com/ilaf/



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Tom and Jerry

Post by Tom and Jerry » Wed Nov 26, 2003 4:22 pm

sy wrote:I think you all read vp's question wrong. If you read carefully, you can see that vp is now in Finland.

You're either EU citizens, citizens from better countries, or married to Finns/EU-citizens. Of course you don't need a lawyer.

My opinion is, in these cases, you do need a lawyer or at least someone familiar with immigration laws to help you to prepare your application: to indicate clearly your demand,
I read the vp's question very well.

It was just simply unclear for a discussion group. Was he/she in Finland or not. Asking for himself or for somebody else, was it a case that happened or only a hypothetical case. Questionable question? Unclear answer! Fair game.

In general, there is a need for an immigration lawyer in Finland. That is true for all kind of immigrants. For EU-citizens who are confronted with a whole set of old-fashioned legislation (think of car tax, income tax, pension regulations, language barrieres).

For immigrants from USA and Canada (income tax, visa, permits) or from other countries. Also for the Finnish who return to Finland (Kela regulations), since these are also treated with some bluntness.


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distantspaces
Posts: 318
Joined: Thu May 29, 2003 11:04 am
Location: Kamppi, Helsinki

Post by distantspaces » Wed Nov 26, 2003 4:31 pm

My caste is B2

Scum...


Tom and Jerry

Post by Tom and Jerry » Wed Nov 26, 2003 5:12 pm

distantspaces wrote:My caste is B2
Welcome to Finland.

There is a need for an immigration lawyer in Finland, but the far majority of all caste members will do without.

It is quite obvious that the people at the ulkomaalaisvirasto don't have a normal idea on legislation and rules. Or, if they have an idea it is from the czaristic time.

As an example, today, again, an official replies to Annikka Forsander, who earlier argued that the whole ulkomaalaisvirosto should be shifted to another ministry. Now, let's see what this old-fashioned ylijohtaja Pentti Visanen answered:

'Sisäaisiainministeriö ei miellä maahanmuuttajia pelkästään potentiaalisena uhkana maan turvallisuudelle, vaan katsoo maahanmuuttoasioita EU-vaatimusten mukaisesti kokonaisvaltaisesti. Tähän kululuu ... turvallisuus. '

Let's try to translate that one. This is one translation:

The ministry doesn't see the immigrants solely as thread to the security of this country, but looks at the immigrants matter as a whole according to the demands of the EU.

Here follows a near to wrong translation, but that is what I though he meant:

'The ministry doesn't see the immigrants as the only thread to the security of this country, because the EU-regulations demand us to look at this matter within a broader context. '

However, the message of Pentti Visanen is clear:

As an immigrant you are a security risk for this country, no matter if you are from another EU-country, Russia, or where-ever, but since Finland is a member of the EU, I am not allowed to say that too loudly. (Please, do not change my job to another ministry).

So, a good immigration lawyer has a lot of work to do in Finland.


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distantspaces
Posts: 318
Joined: Thu May 29, 2003 11:04 am
Location: Kamppi, Helsinki

Post by distantspaces » Wed Nov 26, 2003 10:47 pm

Tom_Campbell75 wrote:I heard there is a group called "Foreigners in Crisis" that ensure foriegners are given good legal representation after some experience of foreigners being given poor legal representation. Does anyone have information on this?
Are you talking about this?:
Foreigner’s Crisis Centre
Assists with mental health and social problems free of charge. Simonkatu 12 B 13, tel. 685 2828
Also, if you live in Helsinki, you could consult the municipalily lawyers. I found the info from http://www.syl.helsinki.fi/asiakirjat/j ... legal.html (the page was updated 3 years ago)
Municipal Legal Advice

The first place you might contact should any difficulties arise is normally the municipal Legal Advice Office (Yleinen oikeusaputoimisto) . This is a municipal service which provides help for all residents of the municipality free of charge. They are especially the people to ask if you need free legal representation in court. To be eligible for their services, you have to be registered as a resident of that particular city. Interpreters have to be arranged by you if you don't speak Finnish or Swedish.

The address of the Legal Advice Office in Helsinki is:

Helsingin kaupungin yleinen oikeusaputoimisto
Eevankatu 2
00240 Helsinki
Tel. 09 - 7312 4170 (appointments)

Appointments are required, no councelling over the phone. Make your appointment a long time in advance (several weeks normally). In other cities than Helsinki, look up the office contact information under Yleinen oikeusaputoimisto or within other communal services under the city's name in the phone book.


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