what is polytechnic??

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patakun
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what is polytechnic??

Post by patakun » Sun Jan 25, 2004 11:13 pm

can anyone explain me, what is polytechnic?? is it the same as university?? or worse? i mean is polutechnics occupy the same level in finnish education as universities?

and the more personal question: if someone knows about haaga polytechnic, they've got degree in tourism education. maybe someone knows how is the quality of education there? is it a good place to study?



what is polytechnic??

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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Sun Jan 25, 2004 11:20 pm

http://www.minedu.fi

Higher education

Higher education system consists of universities and polytechnics. The Finnish higher education system is made up of two parallel sectors: universities and polytechnics. The universities rely on the connection between research and teaching. Their basic purpose is to perform scientific research and to provide higher education connected with it. Students at universities may take a lower (Bachelor's) or higher (Master's) academic degree and also academic further education, consisting of licentiate and doctoral degree. Universities also arrange further education and open university teaching.

The polytechnics are usually regional higher education institutions which provide instruction in subjects from several sectors, and which emphasize a connection with working life. The degrees they provide are higher education degrees with a professional emphasis. There are universities and polytechnics all over Finland, and the ultimate aim is to ensure that all prospective students have equal opportunities for study, regardless of where they live.

There are altogether 29 permanent polytechnics. Most of these institutions are multisector establishments. The polytechnics provide instruction in the following sectors: technology and transport, business and administration, health and social services, culture, tourism, catering and institutional management, natural resources, the humanities and education. Degrees have a professional emphasis and take between 3.5 and 4 years to complete. In addition to theoretical studies, polytechnic degrees also require practical training in the workplace and a diploma project.

There are 20 universities in Finland, ten of which are multifaculty institutions and ten specialist institutions. Of the specialist institutions three are universities of technology, three are schools of economics and business administration, and the remaining four are art academies. In addition, university-level education is provided at one military academy under the Ministry of Defence. All universities engage in both education and research and have the right to award doctorates. The first university degree, which roughly corresponds to a Bachelor's, can generally be attained in three years of full-time study and the higher, Master's degree in five years, i.e. additional two years after the Bachelor's degree. There is also an optional pre-doctoral postgraduate degree of licentiate, which can be completed in two years of full-time study after the Master's degree. Full-time studies for a doctorate take approximately four years following the Master's degree.
Cheers, Hank W.
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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Sun Jan 25, 2004 11:21 pm

Haaga has an excellent reputation as a hotel & restaurant management sc hool. For tourism also HELIA Porvoo.
Cheers, Hank W.
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AlKo
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polytechnic

Post by AlKo » Mon Jan 26, 2004 7:51 pm

Hi,
in addition to Hank’s explanation about the difference between University and Polytechnic I would say that it depends where you will use the education. In some countries the name Polytechnic is highly appreciated and in some countries not. I think that any education completed in Finland will give you a very good reference.

In Finland Aamattikorkeakoulu (Polytechnic) is a popular degree and Haaga has a very good reputation, as well as Helia, so go ahead. Actually there is no higher education in Tourism than these Polytechnics.
Alex
Teacher in Travel and Tourism


patakun
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Post by patakun » Mon Jan 26, 2004 11:05 pm

thanks a lot!!!!!!!!!!!!! :lol:
for me it very very usefull information!!!
are there difficult exams to polytechnic?? im finnishing my Bachelor programme in russia, so after university will it be difficult to pass exams to polytechnc? i was reading haaga' admission criterions do they really appreciate work experiance? or its possible to enter this school without any work experience?


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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Tue Jan 27, 2004 10:12 am

It is possible, but the polytechnics are more "I know how to to do" and universities "I know theory from books", if you want a really brutal categorization. Polytechnics also give only bachelors degree, but you can study it all in English. Helia also has international business degree, and they have a special thing with Russian trade.
Cheers, Hank W.
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Post by sy » Tue Jan 27, 2004 2:40 pm

Be aware that if you've got a Bachelor degree from the polytechnics and later you want to get a Master degree from a Finnish university, you might not be able to transfer too many credits. Some universities also give out Bachelor degree if you get 120 credits (Master degree requires 160-180 creidts). A university gives usually 40-80 credits to the Bachelor degree from a polytechnic.

Also be aware of getting a residence permit. I've heard of some cases that UVI denied residence permit from someone who was applying for a Bachelor program with a Bachelor degree, or applying for a Master program with a Master degree.

Good luck!


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Post by dusty_bin » Tue Jan 27, 2004 4:09 pm

Just a little teeny weeny small point...

Well two actually.

In my expereince, here, polytechnics in my field, economics/business tend to be very lighton the actual doing of any function. They teach, what I would call 'naming of parts', they have the attitude that their graduates will be managers and employ others to actually DO stuff, so coverage of accounting, statistics, finance etc is very sparse.

In the universities, you learn to actually DO the job. In some cases, one would have to take a specialism, for example in law or accounting, but I know enough to actually perform the functions within a business. Most poly graduates would not!

The second point is that the poly degree is fine until...
Until your career moves you away from a 'front line' role, and towards supervisory roles and management. At that point, her and in many other countries, employers ask that their staff have a Masters Degree, even if it is not relevant, although often it is! At that point, of for a year or so to do an MBA, usually, here at your own expense, or try to get a Masters, difficult, given the relatively low esteem that universities give Poly Bachelors and of course what was studied before, often, is not relevant to the proposed Masters degree.

On the whole, from an overall career point of view, apply for a business/economics degree from a decent university. BTW HSE has tourism modules. What you need to learn about tourism, per se, can be learned very fast on the job, the skills a university gives you can not.
Your career path will be much broader from a uni than a poly. (Think of a Poly as a trade school and University as continuing your academic education to prepare you for a more highly skilled role and you won't be too far wrong; at least here in Finland.)


p9277
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Post by p9277 » Mon Mar 29, 2004 10:26 am

Polytechnics are for those who didn't get into university.


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distantspaces
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Post by distantspaces » Mon Mar 29, 2004 10:49 am

As sy mentioned, you might not get a residence permit for studying in a poly. This ofcourse depends on your nationality, but this most probably would apply to you if you are Russian (are you?).

Polys shell out Bachelors degrees. If you already have that, getting a residence permit to study for another Bachelors would be rather difficult. You chances with the immigration authorities would be brighter if you have got admission to a Masters level program at the university.


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Post by aRabbit » Mon Mar 29, 2004 11:29 am

Some good points already have been mentioned. What field is your current Bachelor degree from Russia? What distantspaces said about resident permit on a polytechnic or University admission may be quite true, at least doing two Finnish polytechnic degree in Finland (of course) seems unlikely.

Universities requie international students have Bachelor degree most of the time. So if you are considering some other areas, u may want to find out more and give a go..
But if tourism and hospitality is your favour, then go for Haaga or Helia. Some friends say it is a very nice experience! I think polytechnic gives lots of good to study business-related stuff. :)
Reality is when you stop believing, it will not vanish.


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Post by Alicia » Tue Mar 30, 2004 10:06 am

As a person who has both been to University and Polytechinic:

If you want to read alot and not attend lectures: University

If you want to learn by doing: Polytechnic

If you want a good social life: Polytechnic

If you want to get paid more money: University

If you want to find a job quicker: Polytechnic

I personally like Polytechnic better, it is more relaxed, the teachers aren't up on high horses, no extensive readings before lectures and everyone is just a bit more friendly and available.


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Post by dreamer » Tue Mar 30, 2004 10:26 am

I don't know how it is in the Polytechnic, but the worst birocray I have experienced in Finland was at the University...

I have also heared that the technical university in Otaniemi (HUT) used to be called a Polytechnic, and some older people still reffer to it as Poly. Also for example in France, there is something similar, L'Ecole Politechnique (excuse the spelling) which is essentially a technical university. So, how did that change in Finland to bring a different meaning to the word polytechnic?


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Post by dusty_bin » Tue Mar 30, 2004 11:41 am

Something to remember:

Academically. a university should be more demanding than a polytechnic. So, we can not talk as though they are interchangeable. They are not, unless you are capable of doing a university degree anyway, in which case, almost any poly degree that you wanted to take would be relatively easy...

So, to an important degree, the question as to which is best does depend upon how bright you are...

And if bright; how lazy...

Yes, I have done both and many polys have folk who could easily handle a university degree, but for many reasons, not least the type of course offered chose the poly route. There are not many in universities who could not handle a poly course in their sleep, in their chosen field.

I would still suggest, in this country, that a university degree, if within your capabilities wil give the best 'lifetime' benefits and the reality is that travel and tourism is not exactly rocket science.
If you need to spend a long time learning how an hotel works, or how to deal with a reservations system then perhaps the poly is the best route. If you want to learn how BUSINESSES work, what the functions are and how to use them, then university will meet your needs. (Travel and toursim is first and foremost a business!)


dusty_bin
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Post by dusty_bin » Tue Mar 30, 2004 1:29 pm

Dreamer, in English, a polytechnic is essentially a trade school. The Finns follow the same kind of definition.

An important distinguishing factor between a polytechnic and a university is whether the institution carries out a significant degree of original research, or whether the place just (only) teaches.

HUT used to be a trade school. It is no longer such, they do research and teach theoretical courses rather than just applied stuff.

I guess that politically, Finland also needed an Helsinki based Technical University. ;) But that is another matter entirely. You can call a dog a cat, but it is still a dog.
(Not saying that HUT is not a university, just expanding the political point!)


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