what is polytechnic??

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dreamer
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Post by dreamer » Tue Mar 30, 2004 2:19 pm

Dusty, thanks for giving the English perspective on this.

Still, in France it means something different. For example, here's what I found about L'Ecole Polytechnique (english pages: http://www.polytechnique.edu):

Founded in 1794, the Ecole Polytechnique, a state supported institution of higher education and research, is the most prestigious engineering Grande Ecole in France. The Ecole trains the scientific, industrial and economic elite of the nation.

~ Exceptional scientists, many of whose names are now attached to fundamental laws and concepts, have walked its halls as students or professors over the last two centuries.

The higher education system in France comprises universities and other institutions called the 'Grandes Écoles'. The Grandes Écoles are the main channel for education in Engineering, Management and certain scientific fields such as life sciences. Entry into a "Grande Ecole" is not achieved the same way as into other higher education institutions. They recruit students in a very selective manner at a national level. It involves the passing through one of the 200 preparatory courses lasting at least two years after successfully passing the baccalaureat. The exam is very selective, from the top "Grande Ecole" (Ecole Polytechnique being ranked first), with more than 10 candidates for each place and going to more professional ones. The entry competition exam comprises written and oral tests on scientific and humanities matters. The vast majority of chief executives in France's large firms are graduates of the Grandes Écoles.

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pierrot
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Post by pierrot » Tue Mar 30, 2004 2:25 pm

you cant compare the french polytechniques or grande écoles to polytechnics in other countries. The grande écoles are used for a very snobbish elite-recruiting as you can see at the ENA (École nationale d´administration) where a majority of the french political and economical élite comes from.
In all other countries, polytechnic schools are just more applied sciences than general universities and are ranked, educational-wise, below them, meaning that a polytechnic degree is not seen as "worthy" as a university degree.
Here in Finland, I have done everything I can to blend-in with the Finns, I've changed my hair color, wore differnet clothes, got different


dreamer
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Post by dreamer » Tue Mar 30, 2004 2:33 pm

Now, back to the main topic ;)

Very good information and advice was already given in this thread, further description of University and Polytechnic education in Finland can be found National Board of Education pages:

Polytechnic Education:
http://www.edu.fi/english/page.asp?path ... ,4836,4839

University Education:
http://www.edu.fi/english/page.asp?path ... ,4836,4837

hmm, interesting quote about Universities (from Universities Act 645/1997):
The purpose of universities is to promote independent research and scientific and artistic education, to provide instruction of the highest level based on research, and to raise the young to serve the fatherland and humankind. Universities shall arrange their operations in order for research, education and instruction to achieve high international standards, by observing ethical principles and good scientific practice.


dusty_bin
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Post by dusty_bin » Tue Mar 30, 2004 2:44 pm

dreamer wrote:
hmm, interesting quote about Universities (from Universities Act 645/1997):
The purpose of universities is to promote independent research and scientific and artistic education, to provide instruction of the highest level based on research, and to raise the young to serve the fatherland and humankind. Universities shall arrange their operations in order for research, education and instruction to achieve high international standards, by observing ethical principles and good scientific practice.


Nothing unusual here.
In FInland, education is free of charge and the resources for that education are made available according to the perceived needs of the country. For example, a few years ago there was a huge rash of telecoms and mobile telecoms courses, now there is a similar concentration upon biotech courses, this as a result of governement interest in the field of biotech.
The same mechanism explains why some courses are relatively easy to get onto, but others much harder. It is the government that stipulates the overall numbers of places available for differnt classes of courses. I think if you check, you will find the same situation in France. It does not happen in the US, where universities are broadly speaking commercial entities and in the UK we steer a middle course, governemnt encouragement and support, but not prescription.


PeterF
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Post by PeterF » Tue Mar 30, 2004 2:50 pm

Dusty I think that Dreamer was drawing our attention to the phrase.
"to raise the young to serve the fatherland and humankind."
In other un named coutries the words " and humankind" might be/have been, ommitted. :wink:


dusty_bin
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Post by dusty_bin » Tue Mar 30, 2004 2:56 pm

Also true!
But then this is a socialist superstate! Omitting the humankind bit would be akin to treason!


garywatkins
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HUT not a "Polytechnic"

Post by garywatkins » Mon May 31, 2004 10:24 pm

Although this thread has gone cold :oops: , I thought I'd try to help with the Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) "poly" confusion.

HUT provides some of the the most prestigious technical university type Masters degrees in Finland and carries out cutting edge doctoral research etc. You will note that its neighbour "Helsinki University" does not have such technical / engineering faculties, it focusing mainly on the arts.

The word "Poly" or "Polytechnic" used by older people in relation to HUT probably comes from the fact that the original Swedish name for the institution (early 1900's) was "yrkeshögskolan" which is now only used in relation to proper polytechnics. The Finnish name for HUT was always "Teknillinen korkeakoulu". It's a university (one of the best). :wink:

HUT is still a Finnish + Swedish biligual university.

I understand that some of HUT's Master's degrees will also be moving over to English on a rolling basis (in response to industry's needs), with some departments such as Forest Products Technology (Puunjalostustekniikan osasto) already offering MScs in English as of this Autumn. I believe that part one of the degree is still taken in Finnish or Swedish but it is easier to obtain credit transfers for previous BSc studies undertaken in English from recognised foreign universities.

Hope this is of some help. See http://www.hut.fi/Units/Forest/studying/studies.html


garywatkins
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Post by garywatkins » Tue Jun 01, 2004 2:29 pm

Being an engineering type the "Arts" (at Helsinki Uni) includes the classical sciences of course :oops: .

No engineer jokes please!


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