Help! Need Dog Friendly Housing!

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gavin

Post by gavin » Tue Jun 17, 2003 9:14 pm

As far as I'm aware, it's not allowed to let a dog off the lead in Finland, unless it's your own property(?). (Just ask Phil, he's always argueing with local residents)

Although if you are in the middle of nothing, you will rarely encounter problems.

Mari had a Finnish Hunting dog (you know the ginger ones with a curly tail) that lived outside 365 days a year. Quite as happy in -30 (centigrade)as it was in +30 (or, at least as happy as the rest of us) It was about 18 when it died last year. Out here in the sticks, in fact, almost everyone I know has dogs that live outside. Mostly hunting dogs.

Cats live inside, dogs are just workers :wink:

Peter's right, the vet is also pretty expensive, and if your pooches are used to Florida, then they might have a bit of a shock in the Finnish winter.

We're really not trying to be negative here, it's just better if you know the reality now :? No point looking through those rose coloured glasses and then finding yourself in the sh!t when you get here! :wink:

Cheers
Gavin



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tjawatts
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Post by tjawatts » Tue Jun 17, 2003 9:15 pm

I think there is some law in the city about not letting them off, but we always let our Cosmo (a mutt) off in the parks although not Freddy (our guest greyhound) as he runs after anything small and fluffy and barks at other larger dogs. In the country you will be able to let them off, in forests etc etc.

Tony

P.S. A great place to walk in the winter is on the frozen sea/lakes if your dogs can cope with the cold ;-)


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Just*a*Dream
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Post by Just*a*Dream » Tue Jun 17, 2003 10:56 pm

My dogs would *never* under any circumstances live outside, so winter weather wouldn't be a huge problem. Several of my dogs were born and raised in cold climates and DID have to live outside before I took them in, but not now! I know my Whippets would hate more than a short break outside during winter, and I wouldn't expect them to stay outside or go for long walks if they didn't want to :-) Luckily they're lazy natured dogs who require very little outdoor activity! They do have little sweaters and coats and booties, though, as the last winter I spent in the UK was unusally cold and icey. They look so silly all dressed up!
A frozen lake walk sounds quite incredible!
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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Tue Jun 17, 2003 11:05 pm

Whippets? The grey things that make an anorectic chihuaua look overfed? Atleast they don't eat you to ruin like my friend's schäfers.
Cheers, Hank W.
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Just*a*Dream
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Post by Just*a*Dream » Wed Jun 18, 2003 12:26 am

Erm, they come in all colors and are about four times larger than a Chi, but... yes, they are thin! LOL they weigh an average of 40 pounds for a male. They are like a Greyhound, just a little smaller, but they are not tiny or toy dogs by any stretch of the imagination. You are probably thinking of the Italian Greyhound- a breed I definitely would not bring to a cold climate!
"The more I see of people, the more I love my dogs!"


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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Wed Jun 18, 2003 9:14 am

Well, I've seen a few around in the winter that looked the husky next to them with something I might think was envy... Where I used to live some lady had 2 grey ones that howled like someone was being tortured. Really eerie sound ecoing through the concrete, like a child crying. Gave me the creeps. Was funny to see her walking them because in the next building was some big lanky dog - someone said it was an African or rhodesian something... kind of made with the same plans just read the measurements a bit off. Now *that* dog was... huge. I don't know if its the biggest breed around, but it looked bigger than the Great Dane it used to go out with... or then the Dane was a puppy. Or I was small at the time :mrgreen: I'm more a terrier type myself, but as I work 24/7 and live in the city(albeit next to a park) I won't even contemplate getting one. Would have to be too much alone.
Cheers, Hank W.
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Phil
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Post by Phil » Wed Jun 18, 2003 9:25 am

gavin wrote:As far as I'm aware, it's not allowed to let a dog off the lead in Finland, unless it's your own property(?). (Just ask Phil, he's always argueing with local residents


Between April-ish and September-ish (I forget the exact dates), you need to have your dog on a leash in public places UNLESS you are able to "immediately" leash-up your dog if need be. But in parking lots, sidewalks, and other busy areas....they always must be leashed up.

So the law let's the owner more or less decide whether or not to leash up their dog. During the cold months, I have my dog off a leash in the woods and on the trails because there are very few people. But during the summer the trails become more populated so I leash him up.

Luckily we have an extremely well-behaved dog who comes immediately to our feet if we call him.


Tom and Jerry

Post by Tom and Jerry » Wed Jun 18, 2003 9:57 am

Phil wrote:Between April-ish and September-ish (I forget the exact dates), you need to have your dog on a leash in public places UNLESS you are able to "immediately" leash-up your dog if need be. But in parking lots, sidewalks, and other busy areas....they always must be leashed up.



There are several regulations for this. One is the regulations on hunting (metsästyslaki?), and these state that dogs are not allowed free in the forests, but for the hunting time. I thought that puppies under 6 months may go free. The city or municipality may in addition state that in their area dogs should always the whole year round, be leashed up. At least that is so in Espoo and Helsinki.

I think it is better to keep the dog always leashed in busy areas. In the forests the dog may come across a track of a rabbit, squarrel, fox or mink and chase for it. That's another reason to keep the dog tight.


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Phil
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Post by Phil » Wed Jun 18, 2003 10:05 am

Tom and Jerry wrote:The city or municipality may in addition state that in their area dogs should always the whole year round, be leashed up. At least that is so in Espoo and Helsinki.


Yeah, if there is a sign on a piece of land...that overrides the law.

Tom and Jerry wrote:I think it is better to keep the dog always leashed in busy areas. In the forests the dog may come across a track of a rabbit, squarrel, fox or mink and chase for it. That's another reason to keep the dog tight.


Yeah, some dogs would chase those kinds of animals. Owners need to train their dogs not to chase after animals, then it isn't a problem.


gavin

Post by gavin » Wed Jun 18, 2003 10:07 am

Tom and Jerry wrote:I think it is better to keep the dog always leashed in busy areas. In the forests the dog may come across a track of a rabbit, squarrel, fox or mink and chase for it. That's another reason to keep the dog tight.


Hm. I say don't argue with nature. If your dog catches the animal good for them, if the don't, they get a good run, and if your dog is obidient, it will come back when called.

Not talking about parks here, or forest with 'tracks' but real forest.

Cheers
Gavin


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Post by Just*a*Dream » Wed Jun 18, 2003 6:09 pm

I agree. I would never train a sighthound that has been bred for 6000 years to course game not to run a rabbit, nor would I ever deprive said hound of free running. I would hope the dog parks and such provide at least some chance for dogs to really run! My dogs don't need *much* running, but they are the type of dog that doesn't need long walks, but rather needs a few short runs at full speed. Right now I have to drive some 40 miles round trip to run my dogs, since dog parks are a new concept here in America and are still few and far between. I do have a yard, but it's just not the same! lol
"The more I see of people, the more I love my dogs!"


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Post by Caroline » Tue Jul 22, 2003 9:21 pm

Just curious: why Finland? You mention that you've lived in many places (at least 2 countries?), and that your Significant Other has worked in a restaurant in the UK. Is your SO a citizen of the UK, Finland, or...?

The unfortunate reality is that here in Finland, most jobs where you can get by with English require at least a bachelor's degree, sometimes a master's, and the jobs that don't require upper level education require proficiency in the Finnish language.

Why not the UK, where there would be no language barrier? If you are looking for a place with a lot of Scandinavian culture, what about Minnesota or the Dakotas?

I'm just mentioning these things because...in..all..honesty, it sounds like you are prepared for a visit here, but not to live permanently or even long-term.

Private homes are, on average, much smaller everywhere in Finland than in the USA, and I can't imagine trying to live with that many dogs in even the largest apartments I've seen here. I'm from the States too, we live in a 2-room apartment, and have only 1 pet- a chipmunk- and that's pretty much all we have room for!
Former expat in Finland, now living in New Hampshire USA.

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