Studying in Finland

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Irina
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2003 1:34 pm
Location: Birmingham, England

Studying in Finland

Post by Irina » Tue Jul 29, 2003 6:22 pm

Hi all,

I am half Finnish and was born in Helsinki, and I was wondering how difficult (or even easy) it would be for me to move to Finland (i.e. permits and all that malarchy) and study there, preferably in the Joensuu area. I am a British citizen, but I remember my mum saying to me that I could be a Finnish citizen, but I should have chosen some time ago which I wanted to be...but as we're all part of the EU now, who knows??

I will finish University here in England next year, providing everything goes to plan. I would love to study something like forest ecology and management...though my current degree is quite general. I wonder if I would be accepted to study something that specific??

What's the deal with tutition fees, student loans, funding etc? I'll be in enough debt next year as it is and that is what's putting me off studying for a MSc or PhD.

Any advice would be really appreciated, ta very much

Irina :D


If a man is talking in the forest, and no woman is there to hear him, is he still wrong?

Studying in Finland

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timekiller
Posts: 78
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Location: Espoo

Post by timekiller » Tue Jul 29, 2003 6:36 pm

Hi,

Well my little girl (only 6 weeks old now) is also half-Brit and half-Finn, plus I'm about to start studying myself. So as I was reading all the stuff about how I had to go about it, I read up out of interest what it would be like for my little girl.

Anyways, in the past month or so, people are allowed to have dual-citizenship here in Finland. So the fact that you're half Finnish, (even better that you were born here in Finland) all you have to do is contact the Finnish consulate and ask them what they need to prove that you're really a Fin and that you're claming dual-citizenship. As far as I remember you don't even need to tell the British side of things because they couldn't care less, they ignore what ever other governments say about citizenship. They only care if you've got your Brit papers/passport.

I'm sorry I can't be much more help, but I do know for sure that you can now claim dual-citizenship. Which you couldn't do a few months back. (The news still blabs on about it at times!)
I think, therefore I'm not drunk!


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Sara
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Post by Sara » Tue Jul 29, 2003 6:42 pm

Well you can study for free, although I dont know about where you stand about trying to get grant out of the Finnish government!

Ive done 3 months at Joensuu in the forestry department, Gavin has been in that section longer.

Ive also done the MSc in Human Geography there (not finished my thesis yet!) but it is a very interesting course! Takes about a year and half to two years.

Staff in both departments have been excellent!

I take it your Finnish is fluent? That will give you more choice over the courses.

http://www.joensuu.fi have a look over things and see what you like the sound of. Then I suggest you contact the course leader to see where you stand on getting in.


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timekiller
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Location: Espoo

Post by timekiller » Tue Jul 29, 2003 6:45 pm

I forgot to mention about the grants/loans.

As soon as you get your citizenship, you can apply for grants and loans straight away, since you'll be classed as a Finn! :) I on the other hand, had to wait 2 years, since I'm a non-Finn.

You can find out all about the grants/loans at

http://www.kela.fi/

It doesn't always seem to work lately though. The info is also in English!
Last edited by timekiller on Tue Jul 29, 2003 6:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I think, therefore I'm not drunk!


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Motu
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Post by Motu » Tue Jul 29, 2003 6:46 pm

Hi,

I read some things about that some time ago. As far as i remember you have to apply within 5 years after the law has been passed, so it is still possible for you. I also remember that the fee is 300 EUR.

Check this out:

http://www.uvi.fi/englanti/kansalaisuus.html

Monika
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Tom and Jerry

Post by Tom and Jerry » Tue Jul 29, 2003 7:41 pm

It depends on the nationality of your mother. If she is Finnish, you are by law Finnish as well. (it doesn't matter if you also have a British passport).

This law was changed several times though, in 1970 and 1980. So, it depends also when you were born. The consulate or embassy in your area has quite detailed information on that.

If your parents were not Finnish, and you were born in Helsinki, then it's a different story. Anyhow as an EU-citizen you may apply for these jobs or study places.


Irina
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2003 1:34 pm
Location: Birmingham, England

Post by Irina » Wed Jul 30, 2003 11:50 am

Thank you everyone for your replies, they will come in very handy.

Yes, it is my mother who is Finnish and my father is British...

umm, what was the other question, ah...no I am not fluent in Finnish, I was totally fluent as a child, I would just seem to play with my Finnish cousins and construct decent conversations, plus my mother used to talk to us kids in Finnish all the time, but then she sort of stopped and there were periods in the late 90's where I didn't go on my usual summer trips to Joensuu. I guess if you don't practice at something you just forget it gradually. But to remedy this situation I will be starting some Finnish language classes next term...hopefully i'll catch up fast, although I never could read or write Finnish that well in the first place. But if someone talks to me in Finnish I can pretty much understand most things they say.

and the other question...I was born in 1981...so how does that affect me with the change of laws etc? I should probably go ask at the embassy actually.

Irina

:D
If a man is talking in the forest, and no woman is there to hear him, is he still wrong?


Tom and Jerry

Post by Tom and Jerry » Wed Jul 30, 2003 12:38 pm

You have to find out the details, but I believe for those born before 1960 the law is different. I guess you have automatically the Finnish nationality and you belong to the group: ulkosuomalaiset. They have their own organisation. I cannot remember their address, something like http://www.ulkosuomalaiset.fi or http://www.suomiseura.fi .

If you are male, you also have to go to the army in order to stay Finn, but you have a girls name, so that doesn't apply to you.

The ulkosuomalaiset also have their own language courses.


Irina
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Location: Birmingham, England

Post by Irina » Wed Jul 30, 2003 12:46 pm

:lol:

ya, I am a girl (last time I looked in the mirror) and thank the lord I don't have to go to the army, I feel sorry for these boys that really hate it but have to go...I know my cousins fiance had to go and he hated it.

Ooh, I belong to the ulkosuomalaiset...cool. is the literal translation for this 'outside Finnish people'?

Thanks for all the advice, let's see how it turns out

Irina
If a man is talking in the forest, and no woman is there to hear him, is he still wrong?


Tom and Jerry

Post by Tom and Jerry » Wed Jul 30, 2003 12:58 pm

The mirror is still intact?

Ulkosuomalaiset is the name and they even have a parliament

ulkosuomalaistenparlamentti ?

http://www.suomi-seura.fi

is the address. They also have on their site more information on this nationality issue, at least they should have.


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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Wed Jul 30, 2003 1:28 pm

Irina wrote:and thank the lord I don't have to go to the army


But these days you can volunteer :mrgreen:
Cheers, Hank W.
sitting here like a lemon looking for a gin.


Irina
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Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2003 1:34 pm
Location: Birmingham, England

Post by Irina » Wed Jul 30, 2003 4:44 pm

:roll: Yes, the mirror is in perfect working order thank you...cheeky monkey :lol:

as for the ulkosuomalaistenparlamentti (wow, long word there) I'll have to ask mummy dearest about that, she'll know all about it i'm sure.
If a man is talking in the forest, and no woman is there to hear him, is he still wrong?


Tom and Jerry

Post by Tom and Jerry » Wed Jul 30, 2003 5:09 pm

The name is slightly shorter though

ulkosuomalaisparlamentti

http://www.uparlamentti.org/etusivu/

with an item on the new citizenship law on their front page.


mgrant
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 2:59 pm
Location: Helsinki

Post by mgrant » Mon Aug 11, 2003 4:17 pm

Hello!

I am also a half-Brit, half-Finn but born and bred in England. I studied at Jyväskylä Polytechnic from 1995-1999. The education was reasonable and FREE! Also got a free meal at school and a second one for 5 FIM (€0.85)! So basically I was only paying rent and a small amount for food.

The only requirements from me was to pass the entrance exam (the poly arranged for me to do it in England) and I needed to show that I had 30000 FIM (€5042) in my bank account in order to get a residence permit...not sure what the rules are on that now...

I also got a one-off grant from the Finn-Guild for my studies. Check out their website...contains useful info, also about the dual-citizenship issue (I decided against going for the Finnish citezenship as it would have meant military service...wasn't really up for that):

http://www.finn-guild.org/

Cheers,
mg...


Irina
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2003 1:34 pm
Location: Birmingham, England

Post by Irina » Mon Aug 11, 2003 9:50 pm

Hi,

Thanks for your reply, my mum was telling me about the Finn-Guild and how they give grants. I shall ask for further details about that. Great news about the money situation...hmm it's music to my ears i can tell you...i feel burdened with the debt my student loan has given me.

I've heard Jyvaskyla is a really lovely place, my mum has relatives there. What made you go to Finland to study?

What was the entrance exam like? Is it just a general sort of thing? is that enough questions already? hehehehe :lol:

Ta

Irina :D
If a man is talking in the forest, and no woman is there to hear him, is he still wrong?


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