Soundproofness of apartments in the capital region

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pixelation3
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Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2018 8:38 pm

Soundproofness of apartments in the capital region

Post by pixelation3 » Sun Apr 15, 2018 3:03 am

I've been looking into moving to the Helsinki area from overseas and I have been having trouble finding very clear information on the quality of apartments in the area. Do apartments in apartment blocks (especially the type of apartment blocks around the Espoo that mostly seem to be built in the 50s, 60s or 70s) have a very high degree of sound proofing between the apartment units? I'm concerned about sound transmission between other apartments in the building like voices, footsteps or music/bass.

In the country from which I'm moving most apartments have absolutely zero sound proofing(people walking above you sound like elephants) but I know in many European countries the apartments are built to a high enough standard that you never hear a single sound from neighbours but I'm not sure if this is generally true in Finland.



Soundproofness of apartments in the capital region

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wolf80
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Location: Helsinki

Re: Soundproofness of apartments in the capital region

Post by wolf80 » Sun Apr 15, 2018 1:54 pm

pixelation3 wrote:
Sun Apr 15, 2018 3:03 am
I've been looking into moving to the Helsinki area from overseas and I have been having trouble finding very clear information on the quality of apartments in the area. Do apartments in apartment blocks (especially the type of apartment blocks around the Espoo that mostly seem to be built in the 50s, 60s or 70s) have a very high degree of sound proofing between the apartment units? I'm concerned about sound transmission between other apartments in the building like voices, footsteps or music/bass.

In the country from which I'm moving most apartments have absolutely zero sound proofing(people walking above you sound like elephants) but I know in many European countries the apartments are built to a high enough standard that you never hear a single sound from neighbours but I'm not sure if this is generally true in Finland.
That depends much more on your neighbors than on the apartment. I found the walls between apartments to be mostly ok (but normally still drywall), and the walls within the apartment paper-thin. Wanna sleep long but your girlfriend is already up taking a shower or making breakfast can be an issue.

So far I didn't have any major issue with noise from neighbors, in several apartment buildings now. Sometimes it's so quiet that I'm more concerned if my neighbors are still alive. But all that is my personal experience.

You can read the worst horror stories of barking dogs, tantrum-throwing toddlers, heavy metal fans, and disturbing sex practices at 3 in the morning. But I think it's not the norm. In general, Finns are rather quiet and considerate. Most people try not to make too much noise night- and daytime, but I would say that's like 60-70 % of the population. There are enough people left who don't care and act loud - for Finnish standards. Which is still quiet compared to most other countries.

Though, as a foreigner myself, I would keep away from buildings with too many foreigners. Sorry, they are more likely to be noisy, and often have weird day/night-cycles with big family dinner at 10 or 11 in the evening. Racist or not, I'm being practical here. I look at the name signs of the neighbors when I go to an apartment-viewing. Most people do.

During the nighttime (I think it should be weekdays from 22:00 to 7:00 and weekends from 23:00 to 9:00, or am I wrong? fellow posters?) you are expected to be quiet. So, no loud music, hoovering etc. during that time. You can call the police and/or complain to the housing company (except for small children being loud, you practically have no chance here) if you feel disturbed. If you don't speak Finnish you are more likely to be ignored though.

So, all in all - sound-proofing is not that good, but most Finns make quiet neighbors. Except for the ones that don't, then you're screwed.


pixelation3
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Re: Soundproofness of apartments in the capital region

Post by pixelation3 » Sun Apr 15, 2018 10:37 pm

Thanks for the information.

Thin walls inside the apartment aren't too big of a deal since at least you pick the person who lives with you. I was hoping walls between apartments would be 100% soundproof. With rents being so very high per m2 in the capital region I'd worry that the chances of getting the worse types of neighbours would increase when you try for an affordable rent.


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wolf80
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Re: Soundproofness of apartments in the capital region

Post by wolf80 » Mon Apr 16, 2018 3:10 am

pixelation3 wrote:
Sun Apr 15, 2018 10:37 pm
Thanks for the information.

Thin walls inside the apartment aren't too big of a deal since at least you pick the person who lives with you. I was hoping walls between apartments would be 100% soundproof. With rents being so very high per m2 in the capital region I'd worry that the chances of getting the worse types of neighbours would increase when you try for an affordable rent.
A 100 % soundproof apartment is not something you will get anywhere, unless you wanna rent a recording studio and live in it.

Well, it's a bit like playing the lottery. What makes things more complicated:

- Most rental contracts have a clause that you will not move out within the first 12 months. If you want to get out of the contract early you will have to pay a penalty - usually the sum of 2 months' rent. You got horrible neighbors - you probably have to suffer through it for at least a year before you can get a new apartment, unless you can afford the penalty.

- The rents are so high as there is a huge demand in the capital region. Especially for single apartments in the 30-45 m2 category. At many apartment viewings you will find dozens of interested people, especially for good ones at an affordable price. Especially if you are looking during the prime time at the start of the new uni semester in late summer. So, you will have to hand in your application also for apartments you don't really like just to have a fighting chance finding accommodation.

- Most apartments are rented out rather shortly before the moving-in date. The majority of viewings is in the last two weeks of the month, and moving-in date is the first of the following month. So, you have to cover quite many viewings in a short time and hope you get one of the apartments - otherwise, you might have to wait another month to find one.


pixelation3
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Re: Soundproofness of apartments in the capital region

Post by pixelation3 » Tue Apr 17, 2018 5:10 pm

Is the demand lower for apartments larger than the 30-45 m2 category? Also what kind of take-home pay should someone have for the typical rent of a say 50 m2 apartment?


betelgeuse
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Re: Soundproofness of apartments in the capital region

Post by betelgeuse » Tue Apr 17, 2018 5:17 pm

pixelation3 wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 5:10 pm
Is the demand lower for apartments larger than the 30-45 m2 category?
The rule of thumb is, the larger the apartment the lower the demand.
pixelation3 wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 5:10 pm
Also what kind of take-home pay should someone have for the typical rent of a say 50 m2 apartment?
Depends how much money you want to have leftover to spend on other things. You can use this calculator to estimate.

https://prosentti.vero.fi/VPL2018/Sivut ... ieli=en-US


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wolf80
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Re: Soundproofness of apartments in the capital region

Post by wolf80 » Tue Apr 17, 2018 5:29 pm

pixelation3 wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 5:10 pm
Is the demand lower for apartments larger than the 30-45 m2 category? Also what kind of take-home pay should someone have for the typical rent of a say 50 m2 apartment?
I would say yes, there is lower demand. There is still lots of competition, don't get me wrong. Nethertheless, there are so many uni researchers and other foreign people in Helsinki that all need a single apartment.

Location is key in Helsinki, downtown apartments are rather expensive.
40 m2 in the reachable outskirts is like 800 Euro upwards. Thinking Herttoniemi or Itäkeskus, areas with lots of foreigners, but still rather ok, but definitely not posh. Easy to get to the city center by metro. Same money would get you a 25-30 m2 apartment in downtown Helsinki. If you are prepared to move to Vantaa you will get more space for it - but you live in Vantaa.

You should look it up a bit at what you can get for what money: https://asunnot.oikotie.fi/vuokrattavat-asunnot
You can see the results on the map, compare different regions of Helsinki/Espoo/Vantaa.

You can look up public transport times to the city center / your place of work here: https://www.reittiopas.fi

I would recommend apartments in buildings from 1980 onwards. 50s, 60s and 70s were not the best time for good apartment buildings. Do not take any apartment where they still have to do the pipe renovation - the apartment will be unlivable for several months.

You also have to pay water/heating (normally 20-25 Euro/month), electricity and home insurance.

What salary you need - Let's say you get 2,500 brutto, transfers to roughly 1,950 net, you pay at least 1,050 for rent/water&heating/insurance/electricity for a 50m2 apartment in the outskirts, leaves you with a 900 for living. Now it depends on what life you live, what you eat, etc. You will be able to live, but you won't put much money into your savings accout.


Upphew
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Re: Soundproofness of apartments in the capital region

Post by Upphew » Wed Apr 18, 2018 10:00 am

wolf80 wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 5:29 pm
I would recommend apartments in buildings from 1980 onwards. 50s, 60s and 70s were not the best time for good apartment buildings. Do not take any apartment where they still have to do the pipe renovation - the apartment will be unlivable for several months.
50s buildings were done after the war so there was shortage of... everything but workmanship was still valued. 60s and 70s were the time for USSR style concrete element building and those I would probably avoid too.
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