English makes inroads in colloquial speech of Finnish youth

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hemuli

Post by hemuli » Tue Aug 10, 2004 8:41 am

Ok, it could be Mutti, though I thought that in Nordrhein West Falen they say Mutsi. You're right: Mutsi for the Finn and Mutti in German.


Und mancher hält es wie der Familienvater Steinbach: "Wenn ich meine Frau ärgern will, sag ich "Mutti" zu ihr."



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alloydog
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Post by alloydog » Tue Aug 10, 2004 9:44 am

hemuli wrote:Ok, it could be Mutti, though I thought that in Nordrhein West Falen they say Mutsi. You're right: Mutsi for the Finn and Mutti in German.


Und mancher hält es wie der Familienvater Steinbach: "Wenn ich meine Frau ärgern will, sag ich "Mutti" zu ihr."
My missus says if our kids ever call her mutsi, she'll slap 'em !


hemuli

Post by hemuli » Tue Aug 10, 2004 9:53 am

alloydog wrote:
Und mancher hält es wie der Familienvater Steinbach: "Wenn ich meine Frau ärgern will, sag ich "Mutti" zu ihr."
My missus says if our kids ever call her mutsi, she'll slap 'em !
Amen.


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Mook
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Post by Mook » Tue Aug 10, 2004 10:31 am

alloydog wrote:My missus says if our kids ever call her mutsi, she'll slap 'em !
Similarly, it's very possible to get a slap for calling the missus "the missus" :-)
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Post by alloydog » Tue Aug 10, 2004 11:00 am

Mook wrote:
alloydog wrote:My missus says if our kids ever call her mutsi, she'll slap 'em !
Similarly, it's very possible to get a slap for calling the missus "the missus" :-)
within her hearing, I use terms like "Oh exhaulted one" ...


sy
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Post by sy » Tue Aug 10, 2004 11:01 am

In his article "Suomen kieli, englannin mieli" appeared in Kielikello (2/2004), Jaakko Anhava listed the following:

English term - new or "incorrect" Finnish translation - old or "correct" Finnish term

friendly fire - ystävällinen tuli - omien tuli
combat boots - taistelusaappaat - sotilassaappaat
area code - aluekoodi - suuntanumero
Hadean age - Haadinen maailmankausi - atsooinen maailmankausi
whales and dolphins - suurvalaat ja delfiinit - valaat
ape and monkey - ihmis- ja häntäapina - apinat
moths and butterflies - yö- ja päiväperhoset - perhoset
street credibility - katu-uskottavuus
Money has no earmarks - rahalla ei ole korvamerkkejä - rahassa ei ole omistajan leimaa
abstract - abstrakti - tiivistelmä
index - indeksi - hakemisto
italics added - kursivointi lisätty - kursivointi minun
count your blessings - laske siunauksesi - muista ilonaiheitasi
kangaroo court - kenguruoikeus - karnevaalituomioistuin
smoking gun - savuava ase - ratkaiseva todiste
ashes - tuhkat - tuhka
oval office - ovaali työhuone - soikea työhuone

You see, English is creeping into Finnish minds.


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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Tue Aug 10, 2004 11:14 am

Half of those are lame. I mean moth = kiitäjä and butterfly = perhonen. I'd be more distressed if they talked about 'voikärpänen'.
Cheers, Hank W.
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bretti_kivi
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Post by bretti_kivi » Tue Aug 10, 2004 11:18 am

voikärpänen - like it.

but bear in mind that all these words are "finnified" - "indeksi" is a case in point - and maybe the language becomes more logical through this kind of development??

Bret
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hemuli

Post by hemuli » Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:02 pm

sy wrote:In his article "Suomen kieli, englannin mieli" appeared in Kielikello (2/2004), Jaakko Anhava listed the following:

.
Nice list. I must read that article. These are used in business and by some writers, but not in the specific language of the young people. I noticed for instance that the teenagers do everything to finlandize the computer terms.

Is there also an article like suomen viranomaiskieli, venäjän mieli ?


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Andrew_S
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Post by Andrew_S » Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:22 pm

matsi - (sports) match - ottelu
flirtailla - flirt
visitellä - make a visit
spiikerit - speakers (heard an old guy say that)

...and many more.

A standard word from Dutch
rahti - freight
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hemuli

Post by hemuli » Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:50 pm

Andrew_S wrote: A standard word from Dutch
rahti - freight
Sorry, that's friisian, not Dutch. It's an old word from 1100 or so, when the Frisians controlled the Baltic trade. Many more ship-related Finnish words are from the frisian language (also Friisilä).


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Post by alloydog » Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:57 pm

hemuli wrote:
Andrew_S wrote: A standard word from Dutch
rahti - freight
Sorry, that's friisian, not Dutch. It's an old word from 1100 or so, when the Frisians controlled the Baltic trade. Many more ship-related Finnish words are from the frisian language (also Friisilä).
They also gave those black & white dairy cows ...


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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Tue Aug 10, 2004 1:24 pm

Many words have come through Swedish, I think matsi and flirtti are from that strata.

Kitchen Finnish ~ 1890-1900's 'Swinglish'
http://koti.mbnet.fi/joyhan/keitti.htm

menen pankrottiin palkonkiremontista
(I'll go bankrupt from balconyrepairs)
- no English involved in there, even the origins are the same.
Cheers, Hank W.
sitting here like a lemon looking for a gin.


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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Tue Aug 10, 2004 1:31 pm

Heres a helsinki slang dictionary.
http://koti.mbnet.fi/joyhan/SUOSLA1VER.htm

You can see '9' a lot of English words... like 'apaut' or 'öbaut', ar$e, frontata, fäggäri, gängstä, - but something like 'geimit' is already from the 1940's...

A lot of old maritime slang, I think 'gaiffari' and 'gaffer' (as in officer)
Cheers, Hank W.
sitting here like a lemon looking for a gin.


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