Residence Permit Types ?

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odon
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Post by odon » Fri Oct 21, 2005 5:05 pm

Hello........

i got Visa type A2 on 31.02.2002 and after 2 yrs on this on 2004 i got permanent residence, i will send u by pm the address of the lawyer....i happened to have his card!!

goodluck..... :)



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EphesusExtra
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Post by EphesusExtra » Fri Oct 21, 2005 10:12 pm

Jeezz... And I had thought that the bureocracy in Turkey was a pain in the ass.. Well I dont know how to refer it after seeing the process in Finland and reading daryl's very useful advices. Good luck dark. I mean it :P
In soviet army it takes more courage to go retreat than to advance..Stalin


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daryl
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Post by daryl » Tue Nov 01, 2005 12:30 am

Just by way of an addendum to a remark that I posted here a while back. The Helsinki police have just agreed to issue appeal instructions for a worker's residence permit decision made in September 2004. In a few days I shall file appeals at the administrative court concerning this 14 month-old decision AND the decision on a continuation permit made in October of this year.

The police seemed genuinely suprised at what they have been forced to do in this case, but the plain fact of the matter is that their procedures have not yet fallen completely into line with the laws governing appeals in administrative matters, even though they have been issuing appealable residence permit decisions for several years.

I now freely predict that we shall soon see an end to the practice of simply returning the passport with a sticker in it. No public authority can live with the prospect that its decisions can remain legally uncertain indefinitely.

T: daryl

[quote="daryl"]The ordinary appeal period is 30 days counted from the day after the appeal instructions were provided. I understand that in some cases the police simply hand back the passport with a permit stamp. The appeal period in these cases effectively remains open indefinitely, as appeal instructions have not been provided. In such cases a concerned party simply requests the missing appeal instructions and then has 30 days to appeal [section 16 of the Administrative Judicial Procedures Act].


vikas_aggarwal11
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Hi

Post by vikas_aggarwal11 » Mon Feb 27, 2006 12:44 pm

Hi,

I have a very simple question.

What exactly is a permanent residence permit.

If I get Permanent residence permit in Finland does that mean that I can stay through out Europe anytime for as much as duration I want.

How is permanent residence permit different from citizenship?

Regards,
-Vikas


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sinikettu
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Re: Hi

Post by sinikettu » Mon Feb 27, 2006 1:03 pm

vikas_aggarwal11 wrote:Hi,


What exactly is a permanent residence permit.

If I get Permanent residence permit in Finland does that mean that I can stay through out Europe anytime for as much as duration I want.

How is permanent residence permit different from citizenship?

Regards,
-Vikas


1: permanent residence permit. allows you to reside permanently in FINLAND you can apply for one when you have resided here for I believe at least 5 years..in a permanent address..application is made at the local police station.

2: As a permanent resident you are still a citizen of India..you have an Indian passport...your travel out of Finland is still by use of that passport and any visa needed by an Indian citizen will still be needed.

3: If you apply for and are granted Finnish citizenship...you then are treated as a Finn and can travel/reside where ever as a full member of the EU.


Reading material here:
http://www.uvi.fi/netcomm/Default.asp?language=EN


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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Mon Feb 27, 2006 1:57 pm

If you are a resident you live in Finland.
If you are citizen you are Finnish.

These are neither mutually inclusive nor exclusive.

A Chinese citizen can be a resident of China.
A Chinese citizen can be resident of Finland.
A Finnish citizen can be a resident of China.
A Finnish citizen can be a resident of Finland..
Cheers, Hank W.
sitting here like a lemon looking for a gin.


vikas_aggarwal11
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Post by vikas_aggarwal11 » Mon Feb 27, 2006 2:20 pm

Sorry for my little knowledge about these issues but I need to further clarify this.

Ok To clear my doubt I will present a simple scenario.

Lets suppose I get Permanent Residence Permit here in Finland after so called 4-5 years and then I decide to move back to my home country for few years.

later If I want to move back to Finland do I need to apply for a fresh Visa or my Permanent Residence permit will allow me to travel back to Finland.

Regards,
-Vikas


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Hank W.
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Post by Hank W. » Mon Feb 27, 2006 3:03 pm

If you have a valid PR and you've not exceeded the limitation, probably yes. But it depends on the case.
Cheers, Hank W.
sitting here like a lemon looking for a gin.


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sinikettu
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Post by sinikettu » Mon Feb 27, 2006 3:19 pm

Hank W. wrote:If you have a valid PR and you've not exceeded the limitation, probably yes. But it depends on the case.


As Hank says probably.. yes... unless you left (fled) for a not very nice reason..(ran up some debts and did not pay them ).. and unless you have been away from Finland a long time..
I believe it is at this moment in time .. two or perhaps 3 years...but ...that is a simple question to ask your local police immigration before you leave.....as it could well be different by then.
By the way...
When you get a permanent resident status the police will put a stamp to indicate this in your Indian passport..so make sure your passport does not expire whenever you are back in India. Because then you have to get to a Finnish police station to get another stamp in your passport....Not easy in Bombay.
I dont think the Finnish embassy will issue/renew a permanent resident permit when you are living in India.


vikas_aggarwal11
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Post by vikas_aggarwal11 » Mon Feb 27, 2006 3:40 pm

Thanks for your replies. Now I understood it more.

:D


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daryl
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Re: Hi

Post by daryl » Tue Feb 28, 2006 1:10 am

I'm not sure that the answers provided were absolutely accurate, though they were broadly correct.

vikas_aggarwal11 wrote:What exactly is a permanent residence permit.


A permanent residence permit is permission to remain in Finland as a foreigner for an indefinite period. The British government calls this "indefinite leave to remain" and the US government calls it a "green card", although these terms should not be regarded as strictly equivalent.

Eligibility for a permanent residence permit is based on continuous residence "of permanent character" for four years in Finland. The character of residence (permanent or otherwise) is ultimately settled by a court on the basis of objective criteria. When these criteria are satisfied the applicant is granted a "continuous" residence permit, and so the basic qualification for a permanent residence permit is four years of residence with a "continuous" residence permit.

You can lose your permanent residence permit by permanently leaving Finland or by leaving for longer than two years without receiving a dispensation. Dispensations are issued to those who leave for longer than two years (e.g. for the purpose of education or employment), but whose permanent home remains in Finland.

The right to return to Finland and continue your permanent residence has nothing to do with your personal conduct as such. The remark made by sinikettu about being unable to return because of unpaid debts is simply incorrect. You can lose your permanent residence permit by getting yourself deported for a serious criminal offence, but defaulting on a civil contract (e.g. by failing to pay a debt) is not a criminal offence at all.

Another point raised by sinikettu concerns what to do if your passport or travel document expires while you are abroad. Assuming that you need to demonstrate, e.g. to an airline official, that you are entitled to arrive in Finland, then you can get the permanent residence permit entry inserted in your new passport at any Finnish embassy or consular mission abroad (see paragraph 5 of section 69 of the Aliens Act). You do not need to have this entry in your passport in order to cross the Finnish border, however, as the frontier guard can verify your right to reside in Finland by accessing the aliens register electronically. In other words, if the airline gives you no trouble, then you do not need to visit the embassy.


vikas_aggarwal11 wrote:If I get Permanent residence permit in Finland does that mean that I can stay through out Europe anytime for as much as duration I want.


No. The Finnish government does not have the right to give you permission to live in other European countries. Furthermore, if you permanently relocate to another European country, then you may lose the permanent residence permit for Finland.

The response from sinikettu was slightly inaccurate, as it did not allow for the effects of the Schengen Agreement:

Finland is a Member State of the Schengen Agreement, which eliminates border formalities between certain European countries. The Schengen Agreement provides that any third-country national with a residence permit valid in one implementing country may travel on a valid passport, without requiring a visa, for up to 90 days per six-month period to other implementing countries.

This means that your residence permit for Finland includes an automatic visitor's visa for all of the other Schengen States, and you can therefore travel to these States with your Indian passport and Finnish residence permit. It specifically does not mean that you can take up residence or work in another Schengen State without first securing permission from that State.

vikas_aggarwal11 wrote:How is permanent residence permit different from citizenship?


In terms of civil rights there are very few differences between citizens and permanent residents nowadays. This gives me great satisfaction, as I personally spent more than 15 years campaigning for this, and I have friends who worked for it twice as long.

Non-citizens cannot vote in national elections and are not eligible for certain civil service positions, even if they satisfy the other requirements for these positions and are willing to take the pay cut. Permanent residents can be deported if they have been convicted of serious criminal offences (although in the case of EU citizens this is very far from easy), whereas citizens cannot be deported (though they can be extradited and otherwise returned to foreign jurisdictions where Finland is a party to an international treaty that requires this).

daryl
Wo ai Zhong-guo ren


vikas_aggarwal11
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Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2005 10:18 am

Post by vikas_aggarwal11 » Tue Feb 28, 2006 9:15 am

Thanks Daryl,


Wonderful explanation. You have cleared all my doubts regarding Permanent residence permit. I hope this article will be useful for others too.


Kamila
Posts: 113
Joined: Mon Jun 04, 2012 2:13 pm

Urgent, pls help:I need a good lawyer

Post by Kamila » Fri Nov 18, 2016 2:30 pm

Hi,

I need a good lawyer. Can anyone recommend a good lawyer or can I have Daryl's contact. Thank you

Kamila





daryl wrote:Just by way of an addendum to a remark that I posted here a while back. The Helsinki police have just agreed to issue appeal instructions for a worker's residence permit decision made in September 2004. In a few days I shall file appeals at the administrative court concerning this 14 month-old decision AND the decision on a continuation permit made in October of this year.

The police seemed genuinely suprised at what they have been forced to do in this case, but the plain fact of the matter is that their procedures have not yet fallen completely into line with the laws governing appeals in administrative matters, even though they have been issuing appealable residence permit decisions for several years.

I now freely predict that we shall soon see an end to the practice of simply returning the passport with a sticker in it. No public authority can live with the prospect that its decisions can remain legally uncertain indefinitely.

T: daryl
daryl wrote:The ordinary appeal period is 30 days counted from the day after the appeal instructions were provided. I understand that in some cases the police simply hand back the passport with a permit stamp. The appeal period in these cases effectively remains open indefinitely, as appeal instructions have not been provided. In such cases a concerned party simply requests the missing appeal instructions and then has 30 days to appeal [section 16 of the Administrative Judicial Procedures Act].


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