Which Permit should I apply for?

How to? Read other's experiences. Find useful advice on shipping, immigration, residence permits, visas and more.
Post Reply
Bookcase
Posts: 18
Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2019 9:21 am

Which Permit should I apply for?

Post by Bookcase » Sat Mar 02, 2019 8:06 am

Can anyone give me insight on the most commonly approved pathway in the application process for moving to Finland to live long-term/permanently?

I am open to all ways.

I could look into coming as a student and do my Masters in Finland.

Or see about getting an employment offer – How do I organise this?
I could try for a teaching English job, or something with my Patisserie qualification... (I do not have work experience in patisserie yet.)

(I assume it's easier once inside the country to meet potential employers and make connections? I am coming to Finland in June/July. But any advice on how to gain an employment contract long-distance from Australia would be great.)

Or apply for a self-employment permit.
I have an Editorial and Language services business registered in Australia – but again, I would need to make connections and contacts in Finland to develop adequate income through offering services to businesses and individuals in Finland for this to have a chance to be approved.

I appreciate any advice.



Which Permit should I apply for?

Sponsor:

Finland Forum Ad-O-Matic
 

User avatar
wolf80
Posts: 477
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:43 pm
Location: Helsinki

Re: Which Permit should I apply for?

Post by wolf80 » Sat Mar 02, 2019 11:03 am

Bookcase wrote:
Sat Mar 02, 2019 8:06 am
Can anyone give me insight on the most commonly approved pathway in the application process for moving to Finland to live long-term/permanently?

I am open to all ways.

I could look into coming as a student and do my Masters in Finland.

Or see about getting an employment offer – How do I organise this?
I could try for a teaching English job, or something with my Patisserie qualification... (I do not have work experience in patisserie yet.)

(I assume it's easier once inside the country to meet potential employers and make connections? I am coming to Finland in June/July. But any advice on how to gain an employment contract long-distance from Australia would be great.)

Or apply for a self-employment permit.
I have an Editorial and Language services business registered in Australia – but again, I would need to make connections and contacts in Finland to develop adequate income through offering services to businesses and individuals in Finland for this to have a chance to be approved.

I appreciate any advice.
- Teaching English es basically a dead end. Without proper pedagogic education, you are not allowed to teach children. That only leaves adult education, and here you have not the big demand on one side, and an army of English native speakers on the other side - many with education and experience in teaching English as a foreign language.

- Editorial services, translation, etc. is also a tough market, you won't find an easy entry, but a lot of competition awaiting you.

- Studying is an option, provided you have the necessary means to support yourself and pay the study fees. As Non-EU you will have to pay. Also, in what field? Where is this leading to? A Masters in English literature will only lead to a career as a cleaner.

- The patisserie qualification, on the other hand, sounds interesting. I see job openings again and again. Of course, you most likely will need some Finnish language. And maybe you need further training, depending on what you have so far. Still, think it's a good option.


Bookcase
Posts: 18
Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2019 9:21 am

Re: Which Permit should I apply for?

Post by Bookcase » Sat Mar 02, 2019 2:00 pm

wolf80 wrote:
Sat Mar 02, 2019 11:03 am

- Teaching English es basically a dead end. Without proper pedagogic education, you are not allowed to teach children. That only leaves adult education, and here you have not the big demand on one side, and an army of English native speakers on the other side - many with education and experience in teaching English as a foreign language.

- Editorial services, translation, etc. is also a tough market, you won't find an easy entry, but a lot of competition awaiting you.

- Studying is an option, provided you have the necessary means to support yourself and pay the study fees. As Non-EU you will have to pay. Also, in what field? Where is this leading to? A Masters in English literature will only lead to a career as a cleaner.

- The patisserie qualification, on the other hand, sounds interesting. I see job openings again and again. Of course, you most likely will need some Finnish language. And maybe you need further training, depending on what you have so far. Still, think it's a good option.
Thank you for the response.

That makes sense about the pedagogic education needs. Although all I had read so far was a need for a Bachelor's degree and a TESOL/CELTA certificate in order to get teaching English as a second language positions?

My background is:
Bachelor of Arts in Communication, Media, and Cultural Studies, and the Logic and Philosophy of Science
Post Graduate Certificate in Creative Writing

And worked the last 8 years as an English and Maths tutor. I worked a few years full-time in high schools tutoring Indigenous teenagers in English and Maths, and this last year tutoring children age 5 to 12 years old at a private centre with a big emphasis on educational philosophy. Mostly English and Maths, but also a couple of years of Economics, Social Science, Biology, and other subjects as needed. I've tutored adults and university students privately in International Business, Psychology and Engineering too.

Would you see any opportunities for me to be employed using these skills in Finland? To clarify, I don't want to work in schools, maybe private English language schools for adults, or private tutoring for children from a self-employed position.

The Masters, I could do, although it's not my immediate desire to complete one at this stage. My main purpose would be that it would give me the opportunity to live in Finland for a couple of years. It would be in a Social Science or International Relations area leading to humanitarian work. The financial savings needed for this is a big deterrent.

The Editorial business would be providing academic, media, business, and technical editing services. Such as for scientific and humanities research reports translated for publication in English journals.

Honestly because it is difficult to build a business network without residing in Finland, and then conversely difficult to reside in the Finland without a business to get a residency permit – I am thinking the best option may be to develop the clientele from a range of Nordic/European countries and then show the sustainable income from this to meet Migri's income requirements for an Entrepreneur (Self-employment) Permit. This would be doable as it would be a 100% online business, so I can stay in Finland on a tourist visa for 3 months at a time while earning my income online from outside the country. (Or even some from within Finland, as it is legal to work for up to 3 months at a time on a tourist visa without a work permit.)

It's interesting you say the Patisserie sounds good, because that was my original plan, but I'd pretty much given up on the idea of getting work in that area in Finland. I complete my qualification of Certificate III in Patisserie this November. And it is after that I hope to be able to move to Finland. I would still need to make the connection with a Finnish employer who wanted to employ me, and was able to show there was no-one in Finland or the EU who could be given the job. (This is the part that makes it seem highly unlikely to me.)

I definitely agree about needing Finnish language to succeed in working and living in Finland. I have been learning for 5 months so far and love it, every day I read and write for hours in Finnish to Finnish friends, as well as studying through other methods, and will continue to do so. I know and understand about 2000 Suomenkieli words but have far to go and a lot more grammar to master.

My desire to learn the language and immerse myself in the culture is actually the reason I want to live in Finland. Unfortunately, student visas are not given for Finnish language school study.


Post Reply