Nett versus brutto salary

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zoran
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Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2017 4:01 am

Nett versus brutto salary

Post by zoran » Tue Nov 28, 2017 4:28 am

I would appreciate if someone could estimate what would be nett monthly payment after all taxes if monthly salary is 7000EU for single person.
What would be tax % in Tampere ?

I do have an opportunity to work for Company in Finland but could choose other country for living since 50% of time will spend traveling around the World.
Regards,



Nett versus brutto salary

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betelgeuse
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Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2013 1:24 am

Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by betelgeuse » Tue Nov 28, 2017 5:24 am

zoran wrote:I would appreciate if someone could estimate what would be nett monthly payment after all taxes if monthly salary is 7000EU for single person.
What would be tax % in Tampere ?
https://prosentti.vero.fi/VPL2017/Sivut ... ieli=en-US


zoran
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Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2017 4:01 am

Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by zoran » Tue Nov 28, 2017 6:09 am

Thank you for info.
It looks like taxes in Finland are 47% to 52% and that is very high but worthy I hope.


zoran
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Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by zoran » Tue Nov 28, 2017 6:29 am

Per calculation it looks like net monthly salary should be around 3500EU from 7000EU and that is inappropriate


FinnGuyHelsinki
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Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by FinnGuyHelsinki » Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:25 am

zoran wrote:Thank you for info.
It looks like taxes in Finland are 47% to 52% and that is very high but worthy I hope.
For a single person, no kids, no church tax, no deductions, living in Tampere, the calculator gives 32% tax percentage, for the 7000€/month, i.e. 84000€/year gross, resulting in a tad under 4800€/month net salary.


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Beep_Boop
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Location: Niflheim, Suomi

Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by Beep_Boop » Tue Nov 28, 2017 3:12 pm

Jesus Christ! None of you people is able to use a simple calculator to get the correct number?!

Using the defaults (single, no kids, no church, no deductions, etc.), basic tax rate is 32%. Add to it pension & unemployment contributions (7.75%) and you get 39.75% in total.

This means net salary is 4217.5 euros.
Every f*cking case is unique. You can't measure the result of your application based on arbitrary anecdotes online. Stop being a moron!


zoran
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Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by zoran » Tue Nov 28, 2017 3:56 pm

Per calculator it seems to be right 4200EU/month, but that is 39.7% total tax and all websites are showing that total tax in Finland are between 45 and 52%. That is the reason I asked someone. Is that calculator align with real scenario. anyone who is working in Finland compared actual and compared. I have to do detailed research in order to negotiate my salary.

The 39% tax is actual tax in USA and it is known that Scandinavian taxes are much higher


betelgeuse
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Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by betelgeuse » Tue Nov 28, 2017 4:07 pm

zoran wrote:The 39% tax is actual tax in USA and it is known that Scandinavian taxes are much higher
Don't believe American propaganda. Income taxes are not necessarily any higher. We do have higher consumption taxes (VAT, alcohol etc).


betelgeuse
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Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by betelgeuse » Tue Nov 28, 2017 4:14 pm

zoran wrote:I have to do detailed research in order to negotiate my salary.
When comparing to US, remember the following:
  • Finnish net salary is post 401(k) type contributions (before gross the employer has already put a significant chunk to a pension fund)
  • Finnish net salary is post healthcare costs (if using the public sector or employer topped healthcare)
  • Finnish net salary is post any education costs for kids
In many tax burden comparisons, the employer pension contributions are lumped together with other taxes, which means ending up with a comparison between apples and oranges.


Rick1
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Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by Rick1 » Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:41 pm

Another thing is that you say you are travelling 50 %, this means a lot of netto compensation for your traveldays.


zoran
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Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2017 4:01 am

Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by zoran » Wed Nov 29, 2017 12:35 am

Interesting observation regarding Neto compensation when traveling. The company I am looking to work for did not mention that.
could you explain?
the tax calculator did not include any options for travelling. To whom I need to report travelling


FinnGuyHelsinki
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Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by FinnGuyHelsinki » Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:29 am

zoran wrote:Interesting observation regarding Neto compensation when traveling. The company I am looking to work for did not mention that.
could you explain?
the tax calculator did not include any options for travelling. To whom I need to report travelling
Check with your employer (employment contract) what kind of terms it has regarding work-related traveling. Daily allowances and travel compensation are tax-free, if you'll be getting those.


zoran
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Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by zoran » Fri Dec 01, 2017 3:02 am

Thank you for suggestions.
I believe I would move to Tampere area sometimes in April but have to find some apartment for long term rent or house. I am not sure how difficult it would be.


FinnGuyHelsinki
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Re: Nett versus brutto salary

Post by FinnGuyHelsinki » Fri Dec 01, 2017 8:54 am

zoran wrote:... have to find some apartment for long term rent or house. I am not sure how difficult it would be.
Houses for rent can be difficult to come by, but there are loads of apartments available, and long term renting - i.e. steady income - is what the owners usually prefer, albeit it's not in the tenant's interest to have a minimum term of X year in the contract, because who knows what will happen in the future.


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